Phone Call from Police to Parent

Tip 1: When a parent receives a #YCJA phone call from the police requesting that he or she bring their child to the police station for questioning, the parent may immediately wish to consult a lawyer for some basic over-the-telephone emergency advice. The purpose of this site is not to give advice. However a parent probably should get advice about these concerns.

 

List of parental concerns whenever a police officer calls:

1. Anything the parent says to the police is "on the record".

2. Anything the child says to the police is "on the record".

3. The police may be fishing for information from the parent.

4. The police may be fishing for information from the child.

5. The police may not yet have enough information to charge the child.

6. The police may never charge the child if the child does not make a statement.

7. The police may charge the child if the child makes a statement.

8. The child may be more likely to be charged if the child makes a statement.

9. If the parent brings the child to the police station, the child may be more likely to make a statement.

10. If the parent tells the child to tell everything to the police, the child may be more likely to be charged.

 


It is very difficult for a parent in this situation. You may be receiving information from the police that is confusing. You may be receiving information from police that they do not intend to charge your son or daughter. You are torn between your concern to protect your child and the "responsibility" that the police are heaping on your shoulders. The police may be minimizing the seriousness of the involvement by your son or daughter.

What you should do:

1. Consider making a phone call to a lawyer to discuss what you should do on an emergency basis.

2. Hold off on bringing the child to the police until you have legal advice.

3. Book a face-to-face consultation with a lawyer before the meeting with the police if at all possible.

4. If police haven't arrested your child already, there is probably no urgency precluding good in-person legal advice before the visit to the police station.

 

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Stephen R. Biss, Barrister & Solicitor

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Advertisement. Any legal opinions expressed at this site relate to the Province of Ontario, Canada only. If you reside or carry on business in any other jurisdiction please consult a lawyer, solicitor, or attorney in your own jurisdiction. WARNING: All information contained herein is provided for the purpose of providing basic information only and should not be construed as formal legal advice. The author disclaims any and all liability resulting from reliance upon such information. You are strongly encouraged to seek and retain professional legal advice before relying upon any of the information contained herein.